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6 tips for landing a summer job


If you’re in the market for a summer job, your prospects are looking hot. According to a new CareerBuilder survey, 41 percent of employers plan to hire seasonal workers for the summer. The vast majority (88 percent) expect to transition some summer hires into permanent roles, up from 79 percent last year.


Even better news? These summer jobs will pay well, too. The majority of employers hiring this summer (87 percent) plan to pay $10 or more per hour on average, 56 percent expect to pay $12 or more per hour and 25 percent plan to pay $15 or more per hour. Considering the federal minimum wage is $7.25, a majority of these jobs will pay well over minimum wage.


Who are companies looking to hire?
According to the survey, employers are targeting both younger and more mature workers to fill their summertime roles. Nearly 3 in 4 (73 percent) say they plan to recruit college students, 39 percent say high school students and 26 percent say retirees. Two in five employers hiring for the summer are looking to hire veterans for their summer positions.


What positions are companies hiring for?
When you think summer job, you probably think lifeguard, camp counselor or something related to the outdoors. Yet, many positions are available in (air-conditioned) offices or corporate settings. Areas where employers are hiring include customer service (25 percent), IT (25 percent), office support (25 percent) and engineering (18 percent).


Advice for your seasonal job search
While summer workers may be in demand, you can’t just slack on your job search. If you want to land a good job – and potentially make it permanent – you’ll need to follow these tips to make the right kind of impression with employers.


1. Apply ASAP. Employers have already started recruiting for summer positions, so now is the time to submit your applications. While it’s important to customize your application materials as much as possible, tools such as CareerBuilder’s Quick Apply All let you apply to multiple similar positions simultaneously, saving you time and getting you closer to landing your summer job.


2. Take the opportunity seriously. While movies may depict summer jobs as a temporary gig where you can put in the minimum amount of effort, if you want to get your foot in the door at an organization, you need to take the job seriously. Treat it as you would any full-time role by thoroughly researching the position and company, preparing for interviews and following up to show your interest. And let the hiring manager know up front if you’d like a permanent role down the line – it will help you stand out as a candidate.


3. Be flexible. If you’re up for working any shift, you’ll up your chances of getting hired, and you’ll make your manager happy once you’re on the job. Also, be willing to take on responsibilities that may not have been in the original job description – by showing you’ll go above and beyond, you’ll prove you’re worth keeping around.


4. Dress appropriately. You may be tempted to wear more casual attire when interviewing for a summer job, but it’s important to dress for the role and the company, not for the season in which the job is offered. Check out this handy guide for what to wear to different types of job interviews.


5. Apply for the right reasons. When searching for summer jobs, don’t just apply for the ones with the best employee discounts. Seek out jobs that will be a stepping stone on your career path. Speaking of employee discounts – don’t ask about them during the interview; that’s a surefire way to leave a bad impression.


6. Show you’re excited. Sure, the summer gig may not be your dream job, but you should still act like it is during the interview and once you’re on the job. A little enthusiasm can go a long way especially when employers are assessing whether you can provide good service to internal or external customers.